Profiles of the Joint Board of Trustees and Advisors

Chair

Annette Lawson, Ph.D.; OBE

Annette is an ex-academic – a sociologist – and an activist feminist who, for many years, has held leading positions in women’s organisations seeking gender equality and women’s access to their human rights. She has worked at UK, European and UN levels and brings expertise in relations to and lobbying government.  She has written on mental illness and disability and is deeply conscious of the difficulties faced both by those with these issues and also by their families and carers.

Annette was the awarded the OBE for services to diversity in 2004.

 

Honorary Treasurer

Peter Lawrence

Peter was pleased to support the foundation of the Trust by giving his time and experience for these reasons; as Judith’s brother, Peter was aware of the difficulty his parents had, in locating the best advice on diagnosis of her problems, which now are recognised as learning disability coupled with mental illness, and he wanted to cast light on the problems faced by those in a similar situation today. It seemed obvious that more research was needed into the best methods of encouraging early recognition of the symptoms, finding suitable treatment, training staff in delivering the right care and blazing a trail towards a life in the community for people with these difficulties. It is necessary to help find the best mode of life for those who must be sheltered to some extent from the stresses of modern society but are still capable of a useful life. The Judith Trust has helped, and can continue to help fulfill these aims by sponsoring research, advocating inclusion in the community and agitating for their problems to be addressed.

Honorary Secretary

Charlotte Collins

Niece of Judith, BSc in Environmental Sciences, qualified solicitor, formerly a Government Legal adviser to the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and now a full-time mother.

 

 

Trustees

Dr Geraldine Holt

Geraldine is honorary senior lecturer at the Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. She worked for many years as a consultant psychiatrist and is widely published on the mental health of people with learning disabilities. She has served on a number of national and international bodies with this focus. The Judith Trust is unique in in its gender sensitive approach to a group of people who traditionally fall between the perceived remits of “mental health” and “learning disability” agencies. It is this important area that interests Geraldine.

Dr Collin Samson

Colin studied sociology and medical anthropology in the United States and Britain. His more recent interests have been in questions of intercultural contact. Colin currently teaches at the University of Essex on a variety of undergraduate courses including ‘Visions of American Society’ and ‘Social and Political Conflicts in Health.’ He also teaches on a number of MA courses including the course Colonialism and Human Rights that examines contemporary human rights conflicts through history, film and art. Colin has been working with the Innu peoples of the Labrador-Quebec peninsula since 1994.His book on the effects of forced assimilation, A Way of Life that Does Not Exist: Canada and the Extinguishment of the Innu published in 2003 was honoured with the Pierre Savard Award by the International Council for Canadian Studies in 2006.

Among Colin’s other interests are health and mental health, and interdisciplinary engagements with the arts and humanities.

Advisors

Linda Goldberg

Originally from Glasgow, Linda began her career as a primary school teacher. For 10 years, she was Chief Executive of Cosgrove Care, which in 2001 gained a National Charity Award for excellence in change management. On moving to London in 2005, she was engaged in research for Interlink and consultancy for the charity Ezer Leyoldos. She is a director of Learning Disabilities Resources Limited, a charity which has produced a website for learning disability community www.netbuddy.org.uk, and another, www.jweb.org.uk, for the Jewish learning disability community in the UK.

Since 2007 she has served on the Operations Committee of Norwood and in May 2010 was appointed as a Trustee. She joined the Judith Trust in 2007, with the particular remit of inclusion for Jewish people with learning disabilities within the Jewish religious and communal world.

Sue Sumner

Sue graduated from Southampton University in 1968 with a BSC Hons in Physiology and Biochemistry.  She subsequently obtained post graduate diplomas in social administration, social care and a management diploma. The greater part of Sue’s career was spent working in social care during which time she moved from being a generic field social worker to chief officer responsible for development of community care.  Sue had responsibility for developing and managing a range of community services for vulnerable adults including those with mental health needs and learning disabilities. Sue took early retirement from social services and now gives her time to supporting the local voluntary sector as a Chief Officer for Council for Voluntary Service and as a Trustee on a number of learning disability organization boards.

Dame Philippa Russell

Philippa currently chairs the Prime Minister’s Standing Commission on Carers, which supports UK family carers looking after older, sick or disabled relatives or friends. She is also Disability Policy Adviser to National Children’s Bureau, and was formerly a Commissioner with the Disability Rights Commission and Director of the Council for Disabled Children (CDC).

In 2009, Philippa was appointed a Dame of the British Empire for her services to the public and voluntary sector.

Graham Craig

A retired Lawyer, Graham is a father of a daughter of 44 who has Down’s Syndrome. Graham is actively involved in the Jewish community and works to enable children and young people with special needs to undertake Bar and Bat Mitzvah’s within their particular communities.  Graham became interested in the work of the Judith Trust as it focuses on the duality of learning disability and mental illness, which is set to become a growing problem because of the recent development of longevity of people with learning disabilities.

Jan Alcoe

Jan began her career as a research assistant at Bristol University looking at social education opportunities for adults with learning disabilities. She followed on developing community based learning disability services for East Sussex, designing and delivering values-based and other training packages. In 1986 Jan co-founded Pavilion Publishing and was its Director for 16 years, specialising in the development of materials for learning disability services and advocacy. Jan continues to commission new titles for Pavilion as a consultant. More recently, Jan has set up her own publishing company, and is working with developing countries to help them to use the value-based training she established in the UK. Jan has worked in partnership with key learning disability organisations, is a published author and editor, a charity adviser and a registered hypnotherapist. Jan has three children, two of whom work with children and adults with learning disabilities, and her husband is a social care consultant.